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rome. >> available to lead italy again, if needed. on sunday, italy's former prime minister mario monti announced his plans after his resignation. >> i am not joining any specific party, but i would like the parties to take home these ideas. these ideas or any other ideas. we need to come up with ideas. and i hope the ideas here, contained in the manifesto, will be adopted by the vast majority of parliament. >> he will not run directly in the next election or side openly with any parties, but he says he would be ready to leave the country again. on one condition -- the next ruling party follow the strict plan of reform set to bring italy back onto the path of economic growth. monti was forced to resign on friday after former prime minister's silvio berlusconi's party withdrew its support. been criticized his pledge -- they criticize his pledge to retract some taxes he had budgeted last year. he returned here to the official prime minister's residence. whether he will be here after the election depends on whether the coalition allows him to finish the job. >> he has the capability to be
of europe's economic troubles. those same critics are pointing at italy. what does this say about investors? >> it says that investors are selling bonds. that's why the yields are going up. it also implies these same people are getting cautious, incrsing cautious er the country. he says he will resign once the next budget bill is passed. the rates had been easing for about a month. the key index on the milan stock exchange plunged by nearly 4% ending the day with a 2.2% drop. the euro was traded lower against the dollar and the yen. the future of italian politics is now more cloudy. the announcement doesn't seem to have caused nu ed much trouble investers outside of italy. >>> over in the united states president obama said he is ready to compromise before plunging over the fiscal cliff. >> people have a lot of views. i'm willing to compromise a bit. we asked the wealthy to pay a higher tax rate and that's a principle i won't compromise on. >> he said he could make some concessions so he can take tax cuts for the middle class. some republican lawmakers may agree to higher tax rates for the w
culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because
's highest military medal for action in italy. as a member of the senate, senator inouye continued his fierce defense of his state in his partnership with alaska. my preye predecessor, ted steve, knew senator inouye as his brother. they worked together and produced much good for both our states. that will last for generations. when i was elected to this office, senator inouye was one of the first members to reach out to me to ask how he could help. the unique thing about senator inouye was always his quiet approach to all the issues. he provided me quiet advice and helped me learn how this place works. many times i'd be down here at the podium and in the well here waiting for the vote to be tallied or members to vote, and snon senator inouye was come in, stand at the edge there and look up and just say, how's it going, alaska? and we would have a brief conversation and usually his words were land incredible insight -- it may not even be relevant to the topic that we were voting on, but he'd say something to me about something he knew i was working on. and he would just share a few words. i kn
for broke regiment. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross. which was later upgraded to the medal of honor. our highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. when hawaii became a state on august 21, 1959, annual in a way at one election to the united states house of representatives as a new states congressman. later elected to the united states senate in 1962, he is currently serving his eighth term in the united states and. >> in our earlier and abuse in this series, other people we have spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. in 1959, he became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you were first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> well, i spent some time in washington before this, as you know. i went to law school, but i've never been on the floor of the chamber. and so it was an aweso
with the famous 442nd regimental combat team in world war ii and was grievously wounded in battle in italy. now, mr. president, the citation, the words for his medal of honor are as follows -- every medal of honor recipient, they write a paragraph or two about why he was given this award -- "on april 21, 1945, inouye was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily defended ridge near san turazo in tuscany, italy. the ridge served as a strong point along the strip of german fortifications known as a gothic line which represent the last and most dogged line of german defense in all of italy. as he led his platoon in a flanking maneuver, three german machine guns opened fire from covered positions just 40 yards away, pinning his men to the ground. inouye stood up to the attack and was shot in the stomach. ignoring his wound, he proceeded to attack and destroy the first machine gun nest with hand grenades and fire from his thompson sub machine gun. after being informed of the severity of his wound by his platoon sergeant, he refused treatment and rallied his men for an attack on the se
administration did not take the attitude, we don't care if communism comes to power in france, italy, or japan, as long as there's fair elections, that's all we care about. that was not their attitude. in fact, they were willing to pour covert american funds into political campaigns which, on some level could be seen as prejudice to the free and fair elections, which i think they under correctly to be in the long term interest to preserve democracy and freedom in those countries. we have to rethink the checks we put on our behavior today where we are terrified of having the cia, for example, be involved in covert funding of modern elements in the muslim world, in part, baa we are rightly concerned that cia involvement is impossible to keep secret in today's world of wikileaks, but i, you know, unfortunately, our enemies show no self-imposed limits on them, and out there practice active dollar diplomacy on interests not congruent to our own, and we are standing on the sidelines. it's a lesson that -- this is just one example of many oh i think we are failing to wage political warfare. i only ha
. in italy could these remains be mona lisa? the dna from the bones from a convert in nature rens. they are looking at whether it is lice saw gerdini she is the model that posed for da vinci's famous painting. >> the list of the ten best states for doing business. all but one of those states is actually a right to work state. there could be other factors involved. diane macedo has more on that. >> thousands of people came out to protest. unions there can no longer force workers to pay union dues. but forbes says according to a new survey right to work states have a clear advantage. they show all but one of the top ten states have right to work laws the exception colorado. the rankings for the third straight year. they attribute that to corporate taxes. the pro business regulatory climate and north dakota moves up to number 3 after having the most economic growth after the last five years. the top ten expanded their economies 1.7 percent during the tough years between torques 6 and 2011 the economies contracted an average of .1 percent of the year during that time. all but mississi
have already been made. one of italy's most controversial former leaders is eyeing a comeback. silvio berlusconi plans to run to become prime minister for a fifth time. the media tycoon says he's returning "sadly to public service out of a sense of responsibility." the 76-year-old resigned last year amid italy's deepening economic woes. he still faces allegations he paid for sex with an underaged prostitute. berlusconi denies that. >>> to politics. he served his state as a republican, left the party, turned pent, and now charlie crist is officially a democrat. crist announced he signed papers switching his party. some are speculating he made the move to run against rick scott in 2014. the latest now on the fiscal cliff. there has been very little actual movement this week on it. both sides have their proposals on the table, but it seems like no one is sitting at those tables. there's been a lot of back and forth on television, but what's really getting done, if anything? joining me now as they do every week, cnn contributor maria cardona, and amy holmes, anchor for real news on the bl
because spending cuts are not working out for italy's government. prime minister mario monti announced he would resign after losing support over his austerity moves. a return of political instability there reminds us that europe still faces a lot of hurdles before it comes out of its economic crisis. countries like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money
at italy f-18 is half an hour, not to mentioned the drones that were already overhead. american spectator wrote this, obama's fingerprints is all over this refusal. if no one in the c.i.a. chain of command refused the aid, the failure this is has to be failure is obama's, do you buy that? >> the congress has to find that out for us but it did happen on the president's watch. he did ultimately say it was his responsibility and he could have said that earlier. there is so many questions that we still have so many months after and we don't have the perpetrators. >> gregg: should the president testify? >> that is not common. >> gregg: it's happened before? >> it's possible and rare. these people that work in the white house generally don't come before congress. this is what congress is supposed to do oversight. >> gregg: back to the report and the failure to provide the security that had a been requested at benghazi missions. put it up on the screen. eric boswell forced to resign, charlene lamb forced to resign. documents show lamb is the one who denied repeated requests for additional securi
and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain and ireland have these massive debt. now we cannot repay them, massive interest-rate increases, you and i have talked about this before. but shame on us for not realizing that we stay on this path, we are in real financial trouble. gregg: stephen moore, economics writer for "the wall street journal." on her way to the fiscal cliff. thank you very much. heather: russian president vladimir putin accused of playing politics with the lives of orphans. signing a bill banning americans from adopting russian children. bad news has left dozens of american families heartbroken. amy kellogg is live in london with details. reporter: heather, one russian activist says that every member of the russian parliament voted for this measure should be obliged to adopt a russian child of his or her own. there are 700,000 russian children who need a home. only 18,000 russian families who signed up to adopt. this new law was named after a russian baby that died in the custody of his american adoptive parents. he was neglected. but it is reall
my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be able to sustain anything meaningful? >> this is a very good question. whether or not the civilian efforts are sustainable, it depends on whether or not the civilians are empowered to meet the needs are not. i work with a supreme assembly. what i know about the council is not based on my filtered to allow bela lot of. -- based on my relationship with aleppo. one of the main challenges they are facing is this empowerment components. they have ambitious projects. in the security committee in of did not want the fsa to control the liberated areas. to do this they appointed a brigadier general. i met with him. he wanted to start a com
there in north africa, buzz not located in italy or any place close to north africa. they couldn't get there in time. there was a drone that took pictures but it was unarmed. >> let's bring this to human terms. people like to find somebody responsible. there isn't always somebody responsible. sometimes things break. is it true they were tough in their report, the pickering and mullen report. but in the end are they saying this could have been avoided, really? >> yes, they are. >> if chris stevens wanted to go into a dangerous area, could he have been protected? >> the two phrases that admiral mullen used in the clip that introduced this segment, first there were inadequate sources there. there were requests for more forces. the state department didn't act in a timely way. the bureau which overseas that consulate, that mission, didn't act in a timely way. and the forces were grossly inadequate. an unusual phrase to use. >> partly to save money and partly to rely on the host. we don't have marines at these place. we rely on the libyans. they were not able. they didn't have a national gov
a lover or simply to confound humanity. ben wedeman, cnn, florence, italy. >> i'm ted rowlands, thanks for joining us today. "cnn newsroom" continues right now with ashleigh banfield. >>> thank you so much, ted. hi, everybody. it's nice to have you with us. 11:00 on the east coast, 8:00 a.m. on the west coast. let's begin here, a threat to the strength of the union. it's playing out moment by moment in michigan today. one of the most heavily unionized states in america. that state is on the verge of passing something called a right to work law that would make it illegal to force anyone to join a union or pay union dues if they want to take the job. you've got live pictures here in front of you from the state capitol in michigan. that's lansing. thousands of protesters, none too happy with those challenging this law. more than 600,000 michigan workers are part of a union. they belong. and if you do the math with the population, that works out to nearly 18% of the state's workforce. much higher than the national percentage as well. our alison kosik has been story all morning long and the
buildings collapsed. that tops our news around the world in 80 seconds. italy. emergency officials say structural problems brought down the town houses overnight in sicily. crews rescued several people from the rubble, including a young girl. she's reportedly okay. firefighters ordered residents to evacuate another building nearby. >>> fiji. a powerful cyclone tore through the pacific island nation. heavy winds ripped roofs off homes and churches. torrential rains flooded roads. thousands of people evacuated. no word of anybody killed. that same storm last week killed several people in samoa. >>> ecuador. a volcano erupting south of quito. it shot lava a half mile into the air. authorities put locals on alert. it erupted several times since experts classified it as active some 13 years ago. >>> belgium. christmas tree made entirely of cups and plates on display in the city square east of the capitol city of brussels. the town's mayor asked folks to donate any extra tableware for the creation. >> it's a christmas tree that symbolizes being together around the christmas table. >> shepard
was equally inspired by my grandfather's in world war ii, when in the one in the pacific and one in italy. they cast a huge shadow, the greatest generation, and then all the veterans and "in the shadow of greatness" for any of us who provides to service academy or join the military, we were doing that because we were inspired to do that. we fell in love with america and it's an early age and we wanted to do something. one of the difficult things is growing up in the '90s, is that we had generation x in the millennials on the horizon. we have this kind of bad five. we had to climb out from under the shadow of greatness. and so, we at the naval academy aspire to do great things. aspiring to do great things and sustain the greatness of america. and so it gets me a little fired up when you talk about american exceptionalism because i look around at my classmates who wrote this book and achieve these things are going america is exceptional. and my kids are exceptional. i have got four of them here. so, we wanted to write a book that was called the next greatest generation which some people are
that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much
home to bomb pearl harbor. he signed up and lost an arm to a german grenade while fighting in italy. the 88-yard senator died a -- 88-year-old senator died at walter reed medical center from respiratory complications. his fellow hawaiian in the senate described inouye's unparalleled legacy. >> it can be seen in every mile of every road in hawaii, in every nature preserve, in every facility that makes hawaii a safer place. >> daniel inouye was 88 years old. >>> it's 5:09. much less fog than yesterday morning. the breezes will be itself ig -- will be the bigger issue. here's a look at your day planner. still some clouds out there now a. touch of fog north and west. 57 by noon. about the high for the day. winds will be to the west, northwest 15, 25 miles an hour with a 6:00 p.m. temperature of 50. let's check in with monika samtani for the latest in timesaver traffic. >>> if you're planning to head over in college park, here's what it looks like from up above at the beltway. no issues to report heading around to the 95 interchange. as you can see the fog has lifted. you're good to go t
in a wheelchair. on april 14, 1969, the same date he was injured in the hills of italy 24 years earlier, he made his maiden speech on the topic of americans with disabilities. in every legislative initiative since then, bob dole has been a leader on behalf of people with disabilities. bills like the rehabilitation act of 1973, the individuals with disabilities education act, idea, the developmental disabilities act and the americans with disabilities act. he was responsible for including people with disabilities in the telecommunications act of 1996, and for ensuring that people with disabilities are part of the state department's annual report on human rights around the world. after leaving this chamber, bob dole prompted the congress to pass the ticket to work and work incentives act of 1999, breakthrough legislation on health care and employment for people with disabilities. this past year, he has been instrumental in working with the administration and congress to ensure bipartisan support for the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities to reflect american leadership and values
to address the climate crisis. it is all over the world. venice, italy is flooded. a tornado in italy the other day. japan just had another tsunami. the disaster of sewage and leaks. the climate apex for a meeting was just a in dubai. they came to the conclusion that climate change is over use of fossil fuels and natural gas and oil. the amount of fossil fuels utilize by countries with huge populations such as india and china. we need energy, but we need to move onto clean energy. that is one of the president's priorities. he can create a whole new infrastructure that replaces the military industrial that eisenhower warned us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priorit
country fully fully, over in italy, and losing an arm, such a hero, storming several german machine gunner nests, and so brave because he was an american, he was fighting for his country. some may have mentioned or some might in the future mention danny's statement to many of us that went to a prayer breakfast a few months ago. dan didn't ever go to any prayer breakfasts. but he went to one and he wanted to explain why he did something. and it was one of the more touching moments in my memory here is when danny went through a bit of his life, explaining how he was in hawaii, in a foster home, orphanage, something similar to that and a bishop would come by monthly with each of the young children and say what can i do for you, young lady, young man and deap right away said i want a home. he explained how he went to live in the bishop's home raised by nuns and that went a long way to help danny appreciate and understand decency, working together in community, and it metropolitan a lot to him. and later then pearl harbor and he wanted to sign up and serve. but when he explained all this to us,
a series of machine guns on a hill in italy on april 21, 1945. his actions rightly earned him the medal of honor. he was the embodyment of the greatest generation, courage, sacrifice, humility and love of country. this was a commitment to serve and protect those who fight for our country is one he took personally. why he always stood up for the ideals of freedom and justice that our country is founded upon because he saw firsthand what happens when we don't and it's why he was always proud to stand up for our heritage in hawaii. the truth is, senator inouye deeply loved our beautiful state of hawaii. half a september try ago, he had a vision of the hawaii we inherit from him today. he displayed a builder's skill, pouring the foundation of the modern and vibrant hawaii that is his legacy. and so the greatest tribute we can pay him is to acquire his vision, apply his skills and build on the remarkable foundation he laid for us. from strengthening our schools and university to building our roads and bridges and just today, our state marked another milestone led by senator inouye. we signed
, italy. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. a huge pro-labor rally outside the michigan state house. look. demonstrators protesting so-called right-to-work legislation that lawmakers are in the process of voting on. the house has already voted to approve the part of the law covering public employees. alison kosik outside the michigan state house in lansing. give us a sense of why this is so important to folks there. a huge demonstration. people who are angry on both sides. >> reporter: oh, yeah. unions are really at the fabric of so many people who live in michigan. it's why these protesters have come out today though the numbers, they got probably as high as a few thousand. the numbers have dwindled ever since that first vote came through. this means so much to the folks who live here in michigan because unions were practically born here. the united autoworkers union born here in 1935. 17 357b9% of the people who work in the state belong to unions. it's one of the top of the highest rates in the country. so to see the union undercut by the right-to-work legislation, that is being discuss
overseas. the french tax authority removed computer files in italy. the tax police searched the come numbers milan offices. they say they don't believe they are paying their fair share of tax. that may or may not be true. but if it's legal how much can they do? >> reporter: it's perfectly legal. they investigated various companies and put pressure object them from a public relations standpoint. starbucks, for example, they weren't forced to hand over money but they were pressured into making a special payment of $10 million pounds, $16 million to the british chancellor of the exchequer. they did it for good p.r. maybe something similar will happen with google. they don't have to pay. they have done perfectly legal stuff. megyn: he reportedly turned down being treasury secretary, or the new secretary of business. he says it's called capitalism. we are proud to be capitalistic and i'm not confused about it. he helped america hint down usama bin laden. but now the family of this pakistani doctor say he's being tortured in a pakistani prison. the question is why are we not doing more to
that is remarkable about the life of dan inouye. the story of his service on the battlefields of italy, --, is indeed remarkable, the physical courage that he displayed in winning the medal of honor is alone enough to earn the title hero. but rising above his physical courage and the guts that he showed is the moral courage that it took for dan inouye and his fellow japanese americans to even set foot on that battlefield. what is it that spurs some of our countrymen to offer their lives in defense of a country that shuns them? where does that love of country come from? and how can we impart some of it to those who too often take this country for granted? it would be a wonderful tribute to dan inouye to seek out ways to encourage such service by future generations. dan inouye's work did not end when he took office -- off his soldier's union you uniform. in many ways, it was just beginning. forced by the loss of his arm to give up dreams of a medical career, he entered politics. his was one of the most remarkable careers of public service that our country has ever seen. we will miss dan inouye so much
. for example italy managed to auction some debt today, the longer end of the market. and there was no great move. can we have a look at that? there was no great move of the ten-year yield as a result. maybe we'll come back in a moment. let's just focus on the close out. >> the european markets are closing now. >> it is negative territory as you can see. the fiscal cliff of course plays a part in that taking some of those -- in many senses you could call it profit taking -- not in the case of spain where you see a major underperformance. >> let me say the german finance minister suggested he thought the worst of the eurozone crisis is now past. he said the government in athens knows it cannot financially over burden the rest of the eurozone countries and is acting as it should. he was optimistic on france as well despite the fact the data is indicating we'll still get a contraction in the third quarter, for most of the eurozone. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happeni
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
day that he was injured, in the hills of italy, 24 years ago, bob dole has been a leader on behalf of people with disabilities. bills like the rehabilitation act of 1973 and the individuals with disabilities education act, the developmental disabilities act and the americans with disabilities act. he was responsible for including people with disabilities in the telecommunications act of 1996. ensuring that people with disabilities are part of the state department's annual report on human rights around the world. after leaving the chamber, bob dole worked on incentives act of 1999, breakthrough legislation on health care and employment for people with disabilities. this past year, he has been instrumental in working with the administration and congress to ensure bipartisan support in convention on the rights of persons with disabilities to reflect american leadership and values in safeguarding the rights of every individual in the world. >> senator? >> mr. president, i ask for an additional three minutes be added onto the time of the vote. >> without objection. >> is that agreeable
is justified. there are some critics that are angry about how the eu handle the crisis. italy markets plunged at news that the italian prime minister plans to step down later this month. he's going to wait until the national budget is passed, but investors are concerned about how it might affect the country's high levels of the debt. it means the former prime minister that led office after corruption allegations could make a comeback. >>> i want to get a look at stocks right here, how they are doing. up 33 points. looking at the dow jones, pretty good read so far. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 when i'm trading, i'm so into it, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 hours can go by before i realize tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that i haven't even looked away from my screen. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that kind of focus... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that's what i have when i trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and the streetsmart edge trading platform from charles schwab... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 ...helps me keep an eye on what's really important to me. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 it's packed with tools that help me
service cross, bronze star, purple hea heart, left an arm in italy. a. as he said to me that last meeting we had together, "anything other than the arm?" i got shot in the arm and in the leg a couple times sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and i
a right hand at that point. he'd left it knitly, fighting for -- he'd left it in italy, fighting for this country. he broke barriers large and small throughout his life. but one of the things i loved about him was i saw that relationship with ted stevens. i still remember their desks were right across the aisle from one another. i remember them working and working and working together an owl kinds of legislation -- on all kinds of legislation. and they were brothers. and, you know, their love and friendship transcended partisan divide certainly, but also really they were totally for the national interest. and i think they set a great example for all of us, how we can work together. they didn't always agree. if you look at their voting record, they voted opposite each other a lot of times, but they worked together and they had an exemplary relationship that i think we can all follow. mr. president, i just want to say one or two more words. then i know i have other colleagues here that want to speak. we had senator inouye come to the senate prayer breakfast a few months ago. for th
harry reid. a tribute to his live 88 years. >> after being gravely wounded in italy inouye's arm was amputated. he spent 21 months recuperating from his wounds in an army hospital in michigan. during there he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob doyle, another young g. i. also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he bland to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye what's elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole what's elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the doyle plan and i beat him. three years later dan inouye what's elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate, and in death he will remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha, and it's with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the s
and others died when the playplane crashed in the mountains between france and italy. it took decade toz recovery the wreckage. he was identified through dna testing. one oregon mom gets a special early christmas gift from her son. >> merry christmas. >> i can't believe it. >> gretchen: that is sailor jeremy fogul. his mom didn't think he would make it home. sue said the surprise means that because jeremy spent last christmas in afghanistan as well >> clayton: merry christmas to all of the brave men and women around the world. this debate is not going to go down soon. the debate over gun control in this country . this comes on the heels of what happened on friday whenways conference that was critized and he was set to go on meet the press this weekend and everybody was going to see if he would offer up a consession. he's not budging at all. >> if it is crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our scol call me crazy. i tell you what, i think the american people think it is crazy not to do it. it is the one thing that keeps people safe and the n ra will do that. we'll support
found humanity. ben wedeman, florence, italy. >> you will have to head to paris where it's hanging at the museum. >>> you're in the situation room. happening now, cooking up an explosive recipe for war. a bomb maker fighting the homemade grenades. plus, supreme court justice incites political controversy with comments that some consider rather anti-gay. >> and disturbing new allegations about the owner of the plane that crashed the superstar latina. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. >> he was the elite of the elite. soaring to the top of the u.s. special forces unit known for taking out osama bin laden and achieving a near lifelong goal many could only dream of training for. now we're learning more about the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. who died in that successful mission to rescue an american held captive in afghanistan. brian todd is in that navy s.e.a.l.'s home town. what are you learning about him? >> reporter: people in this town of north huntington and adjoining town of irvin are reeling from this loss. they say the focus and determination that nicolas checque demonstrate
just said. the title to docket -- the was an incredible amount of it zaidi over that document. if italy comes up that the conversations i have -- an anxietyble amount of z over that document. it has come up in a lot of the conversations i have had. there was no evidence for the fcc to adjust at all. >> i had an entrepreneur thomas this week they are distressed. so many federal agencies are trying to solve problems that do not exist. i think there is a problem with that. mr. chairman, have you had discussions about a reclassification of broadband services via the title 2, if the fcc loses the dc circuit? >> no, we're for august on a framework that is in place and working -- we are focused on a remark that is in place and working. >> do you feel like you have the authority to reclassify broadband services under the title 2 and subject them to regulation? >> we do have that authority. >> when do you plan to close that title? >> we do not have plans to close it. we are seeing a sector that is very strong and growing and leading the world. >> you plan to just leave it open as long as you wan
loans were exactly the same at 4% a year in the u.k., spain, and italy. today the four rates are very different. ours has fallen markedly. rates have come in a great deal. i was -- that was the first pillar. the second is that policy would provide the vehicle for accommodating the stimulus to the economy. fiscal policy would be a head wind in terms of the movement of total demand. monetary policy would be accommodative and more importantly, would accommodate the sharp fall in the sterling exchange rate which had taken place between the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2009. that was a 25% fall in the average effective exchange rates of sterling against other currencies. the biggest since the second world war. and the monetary policy was to make sure that that gain in competitiveness was retained by ensuring that domestically generated inflation would remain stable. these pillars were thought to be consistent with the gradual recovery of the economy. what happened was we did not get a gradual recovery. we saw output being broadly flat over the past 2.5 years. it has been a zigzag patte
because i promised we would be when i was out here earlier with the foreign minister of italy, not to take away from the important focus we had on 2013, the year of cultural -- italian culture in america. i said i would be available for questions later. so here i am. once again, the republicans have isolated themselves on this middle income tax cut, the president is poised with his pen to sign it. it has passed the senate. democrats in the house are ready to vote for it. and the republicans in the house are resisting. do you remember last year when we went through this on the payroll tax? passed the senate, passed the president, ready to sign, the democrats in the house supporter -- supportive and they held out and held out until they couldn't hold out any longer. i don't know if they understand the impact of that uncertainty on america's households. i certainly hope they do. right now on the floor we're taking up a bill that -- a rule that will say we can continue until december 28 to bring up suspensions. however, they are -- there is more serious business we have to be dealing with, unl
and permanently disabled. his actions on 21 april 1945 in italy were a towering example of strength, stamina, courage, and determination. for which he received one of the 21 medical -- middle of honors. he and other nisei veterans achieve something monumental, and a sense they had earned the right to take larger roles in their communities. that also came home tolerant of the use of politics different than their own, a sentiment born of the intolerance they had experienced after pearl harbor, but more keenly felt after the horrors they witnessed in liberating dachau, and they understood the understand -- the importance of good citizenship, fair play, hard work a lot of respect for others, and for our flag. i had relatives who served in these stories units, characteristic of them all was rarely if ever speaking about what they had done in the war. from them, my generation learned to find virtue in humility and inability of hard work and the value of family and the confidence that we in america could achieve anything. they taught us the hope -- to hope and to dream. then to do something to do s
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